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Great Corpus of French language Grammars, Commentaries and Treatises on language (14th-17th centuries)

 

The Grand Corpus des grammaires françaises, des remarques et des traités sur la langue XIVe-XVIIe siècles (Great Corpus of French language Grammars, Commentaries and Treatises on language (14th-17th centuries)) groups together in one database the Corpus of French Renaissance grammars, the Corpus of French 17th century grammars and the Corpus of remarks on the French language (17th Century). This is close to representing all the French grammars of the 14th at 17th centuries. Each grammar is presented both in a digitalised format identical to the original version and also as a fac-simile. The Great Corpus is unique in that it allows research ranging from basic reference to in-depth academic research, according to the requirements of researchers and students.
For instance, the user will be able to direct his/her research towards a detailed analysis of textual structure based on the complete text: analysis of different words, of the meta-text or of meta-linguistic terms. He/she will also be able to investigate the pre-texts, post-texts, chapters, sub-chapters, paragraphs, notes only (the editor’s and author’s notes, the marginalia, etc.) as well as examples and quotations. Other illustrations of search engine functions conceived by Claude Blum: further research can be carried out on the actual author of the grammar (according to the date of composition, edition and publication, etc.) or on an author referred to in the grammar as the source of an example, quotation, opinion or similarly as a historical or mythological character. Hundreds of combinations are therefore possible, allowing everyone to use the Great Corpus according to his/her own needs, whether they be basic, on the spot queries, or part of more detailed research over a longer period of time.
Created by a team of internationally recognised researchers, the Great Corpus is an essential resource for every consultation or research library.
For the purpose of systematic study, the three constitutive resources of the Great Corpus offer teachers, researchers and students a vast range of research tools: full text research, authors’ thesaurus (5 categories) and book titles (3 categories), examples and quotations thesaurus.
The Great Corpus provides an opportunity of composing one’s own working corpus, extracting and exporting the results. Such an exceptional collection will clearly contribute to improve research in the history of the French language and the history of the French linguistic ideas.

 

 

1 - Corpus of French Renaissance grammars


The first French grammars are characterised by their great depth and extreme diversity. The genre was not narrowly defined and corresponded to a variety of practices: not only description of the French language, but also teaching to foreigners keen to learn a new idiom and culture which were penetrating all European countries. The books are of very variable length, from a few manuscript pages to 1,000 printed pages. The language in which they are written also varies: French, of course, but also English, German and very often Latin. For the first time, an electronic corpus allows the scholar to carry out sophisticated and multiple researches in books hitherto much neglected.

CONTENTS

[Donat] Quantes parties d’oraison sont ? 14e s.
[Barton, Johan] Donait françois, ca. 1409
[Martin Morin] Principalia grammaticalia, ca. 1498
John Palsgrave, Lesclarcissement de la langue françoyse, Londres, 1530
Jacobus Sylvius Ambianus [Jacques Dubois], In linguam Gallicam isagωge et Grammatica Latino-Gallica, Paris, 1531
Charles de Bovelles, Liber de differentia vulgarium linguarum et Gallici sermonis varietate, 1533
Aelii Donati de octo partibus orationis libellus, Paris, 1585 [1545]
Louis Meigret, Le trętté de la grammęre françoęze, Paris, 1550
Jean Pillot, Gallicae linguae institutio, Latino sermone conscripta, Paris, 1561 [1550]
Robert Estienne, Traicté de la grãmaire Francoise, Paris, 1557
Gabriel Meurier, La Grammaire françoise, Anvers, 1557
Jean Garnier, Institutio gallicae linguae in usum iuuentutis Germanicae, Genève, 1558
Abel Matthieu, Devis de la langue francoyse, Paris, 1559
Abel Matthieu, Second Devis et principal propos de la langue francoyse, Paris, 1560
Gérard Du Vivier, Grammaire françoise, Cologne, 1566
Gérard Du Vivier, Briefve Institution de la langue francoise, expliquée en Aleman, Cologne, 1568
Antoine Cauchie, Grammaticae gallicae libri tres, Strasbourg, 1586 [1570]
Petrus Ramus [Pierre de la Ramée], Gramerę, Paris, 1562
Petrus Ramus [Pierre de la Ramée], Grammaire, Paris, 1572
Jean Bosquet, Elemens ou institutions de la langue françoise, Mons, 1586
Joannes Serreius [Jean Serrier], Grammatica Gallica nova, Strasbourg, 1623 [1598]

RESEARCH FIELDS

History of the language, grammar, linguistic codes, history of linguistic theories, translation, sociolinguistic variations, literature.

EDITORIAL TEAM

Under the direction of Bernard Colombat (Université Paris Diderot) and Jean-Marie Fournier (Université Sorbonne Nouvelle Paris 3): Susan Baddeley (Université de Versailles Saint-Quentin-en-Yvelines); Geneviève Clerico (Université Rennes 2 Haute Bretagne); Maria Colombo Timelli (Université de Milan); Alain Cullière (Université de Metz); Colette Demaizière (Université Jean Moulin Lyon 3); Brigitte Hébert (Université Louis Lumière Lyon 2); Alberte Jacquetin-Gaudet (Paris); Odile Leclercq (Université de Provence); Francine Mazière (Université Paris 13); Valérie Raby (Université Paris Sorbonne).

 

2 - Corpus of French 17th century grammars


The Corpus des grammaires françaises du XVIIe siècle (Corpus of French Grammars of the 17th Century) contains the most notable grammars of the Classical period. Beyond the interest in the French language to which they bear witness, these works correspond to very different ambitions: to stabilize common language by identifying it with its “best” form; starting with French (and some other languages), to define “general” rules of the “art of talking”; to help foreigners (particularly English and Flemish) learn the French language.
They are written in French, but call on other languages (Masset's Acheminement is translated into Latin, La Grue calls largely on Latin, Mauger on English). They can assume different forms: didactic treatises, dialogues, lists of vocabulary, etc. The use of certain methods is reciprocal: Mauger's grammar allows an English reader to learn French and a French reader to learn English. The representation of these works is as close as possible to the original.

CONTENTS

Jean Masset, Exact et tres-facile acheminement à la langue françoise, 1606
Charles Maupas, Grammaire et syntaxe françoise, 1618 [1607]
Antoine Oudin, Grammaire françoise rapportée au langage du temps, 1640 [1632]
Claude Mauger, French Grammar with additions, 1684 [1653]
Thomas de La Grue, La vraye Introduction à la Langue françoise, 1669 [avant 1655]
Claude Irson, Nouvelle methode pour apprendre facilement les principes et la pureté de la langue française, 1662 [1656]
Laurent Chiflet, Essay d’une parfaite Grammaire de la langue françoise, 1659
Antoine Arnauld & Claude Lancelot, Grammaire Générale et Raisonnée, 1676 [1660]
Denis Vairasse d’Allais, Grammaire Méthodique contenant en abrégé les Principes de cet art et les règles les plus nécessaires à la langue française, 1681
Louis de Courcillon de Dangeau, Opuscules sur la grammaire, 1694
Pierre de La Touche, L’art de bien parler françois (2 vol.), 1730 [1696]

RESEARCH FIELDS

History of the language, grammar, linguistic codes, history of linguistic theories, translation, sociolinguistic variations, literature.

EDITORIAL TEAM

Under the direction of Bernard Colombat (Université Paris Diderot) and Jean-Marie Fournier (Université Sorbonne Nouvelle-Paris 3): Susan Baddeley (Université de Versailles Saint-Quentin-en-Yvelines); Bérangère Bouard (Université Rennes 2 Haute Bretagne); Simone Delesalle (Université Paris 8); Nathalie Fournier (Université Louis Lumière Lyon 2); Florence Lefeuvre (Université Sorbonne Nouvelle-Paris 3); Odile Leclercq (Université de Provence); Francine Mazière (Université Paris 13); Valérie Raby (Université Paris Sorbonne); Christophe Rey (Université de Picardie); Serge Vlassov (Université de Saint-Pétersbourg); Chantal Wionet (Université d’Avignon).
With the collaboration of Jan Noordegraaf (Université d’Amsterdam); Cendrine Pagani-Naudet (Université de Nice-Sophia Antipolis).

 

3 - Corpus of Remarks on the French language (17th Century)


The authors of Remarks treat all aspects of usage – pronunciation, spelling, morphology, syntax, vocabulary and style – but drop the traditional format of grammars. This corpus is an indispensable instrument, not only for specialists of 17th century language and literature, but also for all those interested in the history of the French language, of its codification and standardization.
This data-base contains the classic texts (the remarks of Vaugelas, Ménage and Bouhours); collections which adopt an alphabetical presentation (Alemand, Andry de Boisregard) ; texts which criticise Vaugelas and call for greater freedom of usage (Dupleix, La Mothe Le Vayer) ; the volumes which emanate from circles close to the Academy (the Academy's comments on Vaugelas, and its decisions collected by Tallemant), as well as some less prestigious texts (Buffet's observations addressed to a female audience, the compilation by Macé which completes his general and critical grammar).

CONTENTS

ACADÉMIE FRANÇAISE, Observations de l’Académie Françoise sur les Remarques de M. de Vaugelas, Paris, 1704
Louis-Augustin ALEMAND, Nouvelles Observations, ou Guerre civile des François, sur la langue, Paris, 1688
Nicolas ANDRY DE BOISREGARD, Réflexions, ou Remarques critiques sur l'usage present de la langue françoise, Paris, 1692 [1689]
Nicolas ANDRY DE BOISREGARD, Suite des réflexions critiques sur l’usage present de la langue françoise, Paris, 1693
Dominique BOUHOURS, Remarques nouvelles sur la langue françoise, Paris, 1692 [1675]
Dominique BOUHOURS, Suite des Remarques nouvelles sur la langue françoise, Paris, 1693 [1692]
Marguerite BUFFET, Nouvelles Observations sur la langue françoise, Paris, 1668
Scipion DUPLEIX, Liberté de la langue françoise dans sa pureté, Paris, 1651
François de LA MOTHE LE VAYER, Lettres touchant les nouvelles remarques sur la langue françoise, Paris, 1669 [1647]
Jean MACÉ, Methode universelle pour apprandre facilemant les langues, pour parler puremant et escrire nettemant en françois, Paris, 1651 [1650?]
Gilles MÉNAGE, Observations de Monsieur Ménage sur la langue françoise, Paris, 1675 [1672]
Gilles MÉNAGE, Observations de Monsieur Ménage sur la langue françoise. Segonde partie, Paris, 1676
Paul TALLEMANT, Remarques et decisions de l’Académie françoise, Paris, 1698
Claude Favre de VAUGELAS, Remarques sur la langue françoise utiles à ceux qui veulent bien parler et bien escrire, Paris, 1647
Claude Favre de VAUGELAS, Nouvelles Remarques de M. de Vaugelas sur la langue françoise. Ouvrage posthume. Avec des observations de M.***** [Louis-Augustin Alemand], Paris, 1690

RESEARCH FIELDS

History of the language, grammar, linguistic codes, history of linguistic theories, translation, sociolinguistic variations, literature.

EDITORIAL TEAM

Under the direction of Wendy Ayres-Bennett (University of Cambridge): Marc Bonhomme (University of Berne); Philippe Caron (University of Poitiers); Simone Delesalle (University of Paris 8); Isabelle Ducharme (Montréal); Anne-Marguerite Fryba-Reber (University of Berne); Marcus Keller (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign); Douglas Kibbee (University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign); Francine Mazière (University of Paris 13); Magali Seijido (University of Cambridge); Gilles Siouffi (University of Montpellier III); Barbara Von Gemmingen (Heinrich-Heine Universität, Düsseldorf) Chantal Wionet (University of Avignon). With the collaboration of André Horak (University of Berne).